Women’s society, but more importantly, the right to

Women’s Work and Service During WW1            Kevin SongBefore World War 1, women stayed at home. Married women didn’t have any rights or properties. If they worked, all their income was taken by their husbands. They usually worked as servants or in the home. Women could become nurses and teachers, but it was very difficult. Also, women did not have the right to vote. During World War 1, women took on more responsibility. For example, approximately 25,000 Canadian women joined a group called the Canadian Medical Corp, aka, the “Blue Birds.” Also, women played an important role in the economy. They became farmers and factory workers. Without women, Canada’s economy would have disintegrated. The work and service women performed during World War I gave women greater respect in society, but more importantly, the right to vote. After World War I, women had more rights and freedoms, and it was during this time that the suffrage movement started to spread. Women did lots of jobs supporting soldiers during the war, and they began to wonder why they could not vote. In 1917, women’s federal voting rights changed with the Wartimes Elections Act. This act was passed by Prime Minister Robert Borden, and it gave women relatives of Canadian soldiers the right to vote. In 1918, women were allowed to vote federally.Another effect of women’s involvement in the war gave them the right to vote provincially. The first province to allow women to vote was Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta in 1916.  After 1 year, British Columbia and Ontario women got right to vote. It was 1917. Nova Scotia was the last province that government let women right to vote in 1918.In conclusion, women’s involvement in war women the right to vote federally and provincially. Although this was a great victory for the suffrage movement, it is important to remember that only Caucasian women could vote. Asian and aboriginal women could not vote.