This the rescuers come and find the bodies

This article is published in January 8, 2018, by  Stephanie Pappas, the live science contributor, as the report of how the dramatic rise in temperature and heat waves due to an effect of climate change has caused more than 200 gray-headed flying fox bats in Campbelltown, Southern Australia to die. Recently, people and many animal species, especially these flying fox bats, in Southern Australia were suffered from a severe heat wave as the heat has reached far beyond an average temperature of 86 degrees Fahrenheit or 30 degrees Celsius. According to the record suggested by Gerald Meehl, the head of the climate change research section at the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the ratio of heat is only growing and that the temperature is projected to increase even more or is getting worse.   This rise in temperature during the past few days has gone off the bats’ limit, as it rose to about 111.5 degrees Fahrenheit (44.2 degrees Celsius). The colony manager for the Campbelltown bats, Kate Ryan, told the newspaper that an extreme temperature literally boiled those bats from the inside. “It affects their brain — their brain just fries ..,” she said. Reflecting to a lack of both water and shade within that area, there’s no way to bring their body temperature back on time. As in consequences, their stableness and the ability to regulate their body temperature and function are then destroyed. In the other words, the bats can no longer function when their body temperature went way too high. This is the reason why the bats were just suddenly fall from the sky and died.    People who were around the area at the time struggled to rescue the “heat-stricken bats”, according to the Campbelltown-Macarthur Advertiser. After the rescuers come and find the bodies of dead bats all over the ground, they did some searching and wrote the details of a situation via their facebook page, says that “as the dead bodies were recovered and placed in a pile for a head count the numbers had reached 200 not including the many hundreds that were still left in trees being unreachable, sadly a few adults were also included in the body count. It was a long and heartbreaking afternoon..” These evidences, besides from telling the lost of animal lives, also lead us to a more concern about the bats that still alive and other species out there that might as well feel the effect of rise in temperature in the future, thus finding the way to help.