There focus on that how the fNIRS-polygraph test

There have been many past studies involving polygraph tests because researchers have had this belief that they could help with getting a full measurement of how-how the brain works when deception is present. But with saying that, there is little research regarding the use of polygraphs and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to find deception. In fact, this is probably the first to combine the use of the polygraph and fNIRS. In this study, the researchers were wanting to focus on that how the fNIRS-polygraph test categorizes the truthful responses and the responses involving deception in combining the two types of tests together. To do this study the researchers found 16 healthy male participants that had no history of disorders. To find out how good the fNIRS and the polygraph measure deception, the participants had a certain type of note that was considered “stolen.” They would take the participants into a room where there would be an interrogator that did not know about the stolen note and who would then ask three different types of questions. The first being truth/lie that was focused on the stolen note. Second, were yes or no questions that were considered neutral. Lastly, control questions that focused on the participant’s life and certain actions. During each session, there was a total of 10 questions asked. In conclusion, the combining the fNIRS and the polygraph led to better results than expected. It showed that the results it was able to receive were higher than what is typically received when you do the fNIRS and polygraph tests separately. The researchers believed that by combining the fNIRS and polygraph will lead to a better way of applying it to real-life situations involving deception. The main issue with combining the two tests together is that in real-life situations anyone that would use either the fNIRS and polygraph tests probably doesn’t have the time and money to use both at the same time to get the best results.