The bring in investment from both public and

The
discussion leads to the topic of the question posed earlier that although there
is a good balance of planning in Fitzrovia, would the involvement of 3
different entities result in a positive outcome, or would it result in a
messy entangled web of the same.  As a consequence of the ever-changing needs of the inhabitants of any
area in a city, the role of public and private investors in urban area
development processes is changing as well. On one hand private investors are functioning
frequently and additionally into the characteristic governmental province in
urban planning, due to the improved number of private enterprises and
investments. Therefore, the role of the private sector develops into being more
dynamic. On the other hand, local governments often limit themselves from the decision-making
and urban design processes regarding development, concentrating on framing conditions
for plans and sanctioning them through public law procedures. Here, the role of
elected bodies becomes more responsive. Therefore, although the role of elected
bodies is very important to bring in investment from both public and private
sectors, as seen from a discussion above, oppositions will be raised against a
development if proper community or ‘public’ engagement is not focused on. Community
engagement in urban design and planning brings advantages to all the factors
involved; communities get what they want, they develop the sense of ownership
over the ensuing proposals and therefore are more persuaded to involve in their
implementation, and developers / investors and elected bodies in-charge of the
project get a result that is acceptable to the inhabitant community. The general goal of engagement should be to attain an explicit
decision-making process with contribution from the actual stakeholders, the
community and their support of the decisions that are taken. Thereby, it can be
inferred that there is no one ‘correct/right’ answer to the questions of ‘What planning model has produced the diverse urban
qualities of Fitzrovia’, and ‘Whether all the 3 involved entities in the planning
of Fitzrovia, namely the elected council, the community and the heritage
societies are needed to direct private investment, as well as public investment
to actually put the proposed plan to execution’. Rather, lessons can be learnt
from the planning process in Fitzrovia that a successful implementation of any
development plan is dependant on the context and agreement of all the
stakeholders or entities affected by the development.