Operations Management and Productivity

Hard Rock’s management decision to modify its menu from its traditional American burgers and chicken wings delicacies that were popular in its outlets was to incorporate higher end meals in its menu. This was aimed to make the restaurant’s menu competitive in the saturated market.

The decision to standardize its retail outlets and make them more customer-friendly and attractive was intended to ensure that this facet of the restaurant grows the revenue streams for the chain. Currently, the facet contributes closely to 48% of Hard Rock’s revenue (Heizer & Render, 2005).

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Hard Rock’s management also decided to schedule their employees in a fifteen minutes interval with the intention of reducing the boredom and monotony that emanates in doing one task for a long period of time. The scheduling has also ensured that the employees have the chance to evolve and adapt to the seasonal and the daily demand changes that happen in the industry. This decision also came with the regular surveys conducted in all Hard Rock restaurants.

These surveys are conducted on a one to seven scale and their major objective is to discern the quality of food and services that are offered at the restaurants. A score of less than seven is deemed as a flop either in the food served or in the service quality delivery and therefore, some improvement should be made (Heizer & Render, 2005).

The management has also redesigned its restaurants so that they can accommodate the changes in tastes and preferences of their customers. In addition to this the management has opted to maintain a company website that can be used for various purposes.

This website has played a crucial role in placing the restaurant in the limelight as one of the major holders of the annual rock festivals by promoting and emphasizing on live music performance from artists, thus making Hard Rock the leading collector of rock and roll memorabilia (Hard Rock Cafe International, 2011).

Effective running of a restaurant is a major challenge for many restaurant managers. This necessitates the adoption of good techniques that are expected to measure and subsequently improve the productivity of its employees. Therefore, this shows that Hard Rock restaurant management’s need to measure the productivity of its kitchen and the reception staff.

This task is only achievable if the following productivity techniques are applied. First, Hard Rock has to create ways that are expected to monitor the performance of the employees output over a specified period of time. However, it should be noted that better results from this initiative can only be achieved if the management makes the employees fully aware of the measuring project.

According to Zigon (2009), if the employees are made aware that their performance is being measured their motivation towards work is not hampered. Collaboration from the employees over the long run leads to the increase in the employee’s productivity. The inclusive participation of the employees in the productivity evaluation initiative gives them a sense of ownership in the (Walker, 2007).

Secondly, Hard Rock restaurant should come up with a criterion that is expected to measure the performance of the employees in each procedure of their job. This criterion is very crucial. Job performance assessment enables the management to look at the relevant indicators that are vital in various tasks and how each done.

The criterion arrived at should have charts and tables that are expected to reflect the employees performance in each procedure of their job. These charts should be designed in a way that they will holistically evaluate and track performances at individual levels (Houldsworth & Hay Group, 2001).

References

Hard Rock Cafe International. (2011). Hard Rock cafe international. Retrieved on 26th October, 2011 from http://www.hardrock.com/

Heizer, J., H. & Render, B. (2005). Operations management. Upper Saddle River: Prentice Hall.

Houldsworth, E., D.J, & Hay Group. (2001). Managing and measuring employee performance. New York: Kogan Page Publishers.

Walker, J., R. (2007).The restaurant: from concept to operation. New York: John Wiley and Sons.

Zigon, J. (2009). How to measure employee performance: performance management series. Chicago: Zigon Performance Group.