In is the creature who they think as

In most people’s mind today, there is no question who they presume the monster is in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. It is the creature Victor Frankenstein spends years making, the creature who murdered an innocent boy. It is the creature who they think as a demon who spawned from hell. Although the creature has an aggressive drive and has murdered several people, he is not inherently villainous. Frankenstein’s monster is a human being in its most stripped down form and society looks past his affectionate nature and only sees his grotesque appearance and atrocious vibe. Having to constantly be the “odd one out” from the moment he was created has shaped him into a creature who only knows how it feels to be hated rather than how it feels to be loved. Since no one else accepts him for who he is, he wants Frankenstein to create someone similar so he can stop feeling like an outcast. The monster wants to have someone he could talk to. He needs someone to stand by him and accept him for who he really is. It showcases that he is not indeed a monster, but more like an actual human being. Similar to a human, he wishes to have someone he could share good and bad times with. This helps me understand the story because it gives me a perspective that he is not inherently villainous that people thinks he is. The creature feels sympathy towards the De Lacey Family; when he finds out that he is inflicting pain on the cottagers by stealing their food, he immediately tries his best not to add to their burden by searching for his own food and collecting wood for the family. The creature also saves a little girl’s life from drowning. He does not stop to ponder about whether or not the girl deserves to die due to the impertinence thrown to him by everyone; he immediately saves the little girl without judgement. The creature never desires to mistreat and harm anyone; he is just trying to keep himself protected from those people who longs to annihilate him. It is powerful because it points out the problem and consequence of not being accepted by anyone. If someone is not accepted then they will feel resentment and frustration. It showcases that this can be prevented if everyone is being treated the way they want to be treated. The importance of this quote is that it helps me understand the conflict in society, a conflict that is still present today. Humans never fails to stereotype people before they have a chance to really get to know them. If a person has a physical or a mental disability, he is labeled different and is excluded to partake in activities with others. In Frankenstein, Victor and the society label him before he gets a chance to form an opinion about himself. Felix Agatha think that the creature is trying to kill their father; society thinks that he is trying to cause harm to the little girl instead of saving her from drowning; William Frankenstein runs away from the him thinking that he is going to injure him. More people need to realize that everyone is different from each other; someone may look different or feel differently about something, and that does not matter at all because in the end we are just all human beings who want to be loved and respected no matter how different we are from each other. It enlightened me that the real monster is society and its ability to judge people quickly based on their weight, skin color, fluency, and economic status. ¬†Given these points, Victor’s creation is not the monster. He is someone who is misguided by his creator and abandoned by society. Someone who is newly born into this world cannot be inherently evil because everyone is born without a sense of what is right or wrong. The real monsters are his own creator and the people who judge him based off his appearance and fail to accept him for who he truly is. The isolation that he is feeling makes him walk on the wrong path when all he wants is to be loved and accepted. If Frankenstein had realized the significance of educating and nurturing his creation, the creation would have never ever turned wicked.